Risen as grain, risen as bread (Resurrection Triptych, Pt 2)

This is the Prayer of Thanksgiving I used during the informal Communion service held at The Coastal ZONE, Downderry, on Easter Day, 2013. Between each section the words of ‘Now the green blade rises’ were sung.

So, remembering all that God has done for us in the life, and death, and resurrection of Jesus we celebrate with him in the meal he shared with his closest friends before he was betrayed.

He took bread, made from wheat, the grain of the earth, which rises in spring after winter in the ground. He took it, and gave thanks to God for it, and broke it, sharing it amongst his friends, saying, ‘Take this and eat. This is my body, broken for you. Do this in remembrance of me.’

Then he took the cup, filled with the juice of the vine, which is cut back for the winter, before flowering and bearing fruit in the sunshine of the summer. He took it, and gave thanks to God for it, and shared it with his friends, saying, ‘Take this and drink. This is my blood, poured out for all of creation. Do this in remembrance of me.’

Now the green blade rises from the buried grain,
wheat that in the dark earth many days has lain;
Love comes again, that with the dead has been:
Love is come again, like wheat that springs up green.

 

We thank you, God, that in your goodness you made the whole of creation, that by your Word the cosmos exploded into being, atoms formed, stars were born, planets were shaped, life began.

We praise you for the sun that enlightens, the rain that cleanses, the wind that enlivens, your likeness seen throughout humanity.

We thank and praise you for your unwillingness to abandon us to our mistakes and failings, for your sending of people of wisdom and prophecy, and for your coming among us in the person of your Son, Jesus, who was born in poverty to the knowledge of outcasts and strangers, and who died a death at the hands of the occupier, the tyrant and the mob.

In the grave they laid him, Love who had been slain,
thinking that he never would awake again,
laid in the earth like grain that sleeps unseen:
Love is come again, like wheat that springs up green.

 

Having died our death, a death upon the cross, we remember with joy that death was not the end of the story, that you speak not only through a cross of wood, nails of iron and a crown of thorns, but through a stone rolled away, grave clothes folded, the voice of the risen Christ speaking our name and calling us to follow him in new life.

Forth he came at Easter, like the risen grain,
he that for three days in the grave had lain,
quick from the dead my risen Lord is seen:
Love is come again, like wheat that springs up green.

 

Loving God, pour out your Holy Spirit upon these gifts of bread and juice, fruits of the earth and work of human hands, that for us they may be become the food and drink of heaven, the body and blood of Christ who died and rose again for us.

And pour out your Holy Spirit upon us, that we might fully follow him both in this life and through death to life eternal, that we might share his feast with all the saints in his kingdom that is to come.

When our hearts are wintry, grieving, or in pain,
then your touch can call us back to life again,
fields of our hearts that dead and bare have been:
Love is come again, like wheat that springs up green.

 

Thanksgiving Prayer © 2013 Thomas J Osborne

Now the green blade rises by John Macleod Campbell Crum © 1928 Oxford University Press

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About MendipNomad

I'm a nomad both physically and denominationally, but I'll always call the Mendips home. Currently a Methodist Presbyter (Minister) in Cornwall. I love sport, film, tv, socialising, politics (both US and British), and, yes, being part of the church.
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2 Responses to Risen as grain, risen as bread (Resurrection Triptych, Pt 2)

  1. Pingback: New beginnings – an Easter resurrection of my blogging habit | The Mendip Nomad

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